Should I build a channel manager (travel portal)?

I’ve been running a travel business for past 5 years. We are a DMC for a specific destination.

We use multiple software products to manage our inventory of vehicles and hotel rooms.

I am now planning to develop my own portal with self-contracting hotel rooms. The challenge we now face is few hotels are unable to provide us a dedicated slot of rooms and upon investigation they replied us that a lot of rooms are booked through OTA and hence providing dedicated rooms is not possible.

Hence we decided to build a channel manager by ourselves so that we can have live inventory.

Are we going in the right direction or completely lost in technology? Please advise.

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Bhavesh Jain

asked Mar 24, 2019

 
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Olexander KolisnykovOlexander Kolisnykov, Editor at AltexSoft
answered Mar 25, 2019

Hi Bhavesh,

It’s almost impossible to give specific – read useful – advice, because of the many unknowns to clarify.

Let me provide some general assumptions though.

First, it doesn’t seem like you need to build a channel manager. A channel manager is a tool that hotels use to effectively manage their bookings. It connects to multiple OTAs and wholesalers. And as soon as a traveler confirms a booking at some OTA, a channel manager reserves a room at a hotel and updates other OTAs that this particular room is no longer available. This way, hotels don’t have to manually update each room status in all OTAs and other platforms that they distribute through.

According to your description, you’re considering building a new booking portal. So, in this case, you would act as another channel for hotels that you want to distribute. And there are multiple scenarios.

1) The most straightforward approach is to connect with channel manager software that the hotels in question already use. This way, your customers will be able to book through your portal and a channel manager will update room status across other OTAs. Here are the most popular channel manager products. This doesn’t mean though that the hotels you’re interested in use these specific channel managers. Of course, they may have custom channel managers. You should ask hoteliers directly and then contact channel manager providers for their connectivity options.

2) Also, these hotels (or some of them) may not be using channel manager software at all and may manage their channels manually. This means that they use multiple room management panels provided by each OTA they work with. For instance, if someone books a room through Booking.com, they manually update the room availability in Expedia. Or they may be using Booking.com only and have no listings in Expedia.

If this is the case, you may develop a booking portal and a room management panel the way OTAs do. Then you’ll have to persuade hoteliers to use your panel on top of the existing ones.

3) If you know the specific OTAs your hotels use, you may look for affiliate programs that these OTAs suggest and sell using those. Check this one by Booking.com. Large OTAs usually have multiple connectivity options, including white labels, widgets, and APIs.

4) Another approach is to connect with bedbanks and wholesalers like Hotelbeds if they use those.

5) And finally, if you have a handful of hotels, you may try directly connecting with their internal property management systems. This is not the option if there are hundreds of hotels you want to work with and connecting to each of them would be difficult.

Basically, it all comes down to exactly how the hotels you want to work with distribute their rooms. Hopefully, this provides a jumping-off point to help you decide.

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